Only one key aspect distinguishes the proteins that trigger Alzheimer's from those involved in memory consolidation

Only one key aspect distinguishes the proteins that trigger Alzheimer's from those involved in memory consolidation

17/03/2016

 

Imagen Noticia

  • A study led by the Cajal Institute finds a crucial difference between "bad" and "good" amyloid protein aggregates.
  • The research could provide new targets for prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

Madrid 27th January 2016

A group form the Cajal Institute has found a key difference between amyloid proteins that trigger neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, which are neurotoxic, and those involved in memory consolidation, which are "good" amyloids. The study, published in the journal PLoS Biology, and selected with a special comment in the highlighted articles section, could provide new targets for prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and  Mad Cow Disease.

Rubén Hervás, Liying Li, Amitabha Majumdar, María del Carmen Fernández-Ramírez, Jay R. Unruh, Brian D. Slaughter, Albert Galera-Prat, Elena Santana,Mari Suzuki, Yoshitaka Nagai, Marta Bruix, Sergio Casas-Tintó, Margarita Menéndez, Douglas V. Laurents, Kausik Si, y Mariano Carrión-Vázquez. Molecular basis of Orb2 amyloidogenesis and blockade of memory consolidationPLOS Biology. DOI:10.1371/journal.pbio.1002361.

 

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